Images from Leg 1 – Seattle, WA to Hilo, HI – Part 3

The following galleries depict the scientists of GP15 collecting and analyzing samples from the Pacific Ocean. Please refer to the GEOTRACES Glossary for definitions and explanations of the sampling systems and spaces on board the R/V Roger Revelle. Photography by Alex Fox.

The GEOTRACES trace metal clean CTD Rosette.

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The fish.

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The non-trace metal CTD Rosette.

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Pumps.

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Lab life.

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GEOTRACES GP15 is supported by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Images from Leg 1 – Seattle, WA to Hilo, HI – Part 2

Life and work aboard the Research Vessel Roger Revelle. Photography by Alex Fox.

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The bridge of the Roger Revelle.
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The ship’s stores hold all the food for 59 people for more than a month.
on deck
Waves rise up above the bow of the Roger Revelle.
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An avian stowaway took up residence in the Revelle’s bow for several days.
dr buck
Clifton Buck of the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography with his equipment for sampling air and rainwater on GP15.
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Research technician Keith Shadle of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography on deck.
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Science on a 24-hour schedule sometimes requires a costume change to liven things up. Here a unicorn (Colette Kelly) and a dragon (Jennifer Kenyon) prepare to collect samples in the wee hours of the morning.
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Naps are essential in the world of GP15, where sleep schedules are secondary to the schedule of the ship’s scientific equipment. Here, Kyle McQuiggan finds a flat spot on deck.
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The optimal temperature for the Roger Revelle’s computers is on the chilly side. The computer lab stayed quite cool regardless of the conditions outside.
the argo life chose me
Left to right: Paul Henderson of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Phoebe Lam of University of California, Santa Cruz and Colette Kelly of Stanford University carry an ARGO float. Close to 4000 of these autonomous floats record oceanographic data throughout the world’s oceans.
letting go of argo
Colette Kelly of Stanford University sends an ARGO float on its way. Close to 4000 of these autonomous floats record oceanographic data throughout the world’s oceans.
this tire
This tire softens any impacts while reeling in delicate scientific equipment.
not a cloud not a boat
The tip of Hawaii, the first land GP15 had encountered in more than 30 days at sea.
joseph can see the future
The landward rail attracts a crowd.
yang crushing it per usual
The science party for leg 1 of GP15 assembles for a group photo just minutes from rescuing port in Hilo.
everybody
All 37 members of GP15’s science party stand together before arriving in Hilo, Hawaii.
everybody context
All 37 members of GP15’s science party stand together before arriving in Hilo, Hawaii.
port of hilo
The port of Hilo emerges from the fog of more than 30 days on the Pacific.

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GEOTRACES GP15 is supported by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

 

Images from Leg 1 – Seattle, WA to Hilo, HI – Part 1

The sky and the sea seem endless in the open ocean. All photography by Alex Fox.

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An albatross swoops above the Pacific.
fishing gear
A wayward piece of fishing gear floats along in an expanse of blue.
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Clouds getting some color from the sunset.
gabi and sean looking out
There are no shortage of vistas while at sea.
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Whitecaps as far as the eye can sea from the bridge of the R/V Roger Revelle.
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The R/V Roger Revelle’s winch arm lets out cable as the Pacific undulates beneath.
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The ocean takes on a bewildering variety of textures and colors over the course of a month.
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Blue.
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Sea and sky.
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The sun sets as the R/V Roger Revelle makes its way to our next station.
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The surface of the Pacific taking on a metallic coating as the scientists of GP15 search for iron, cobalt and manganese (to name a few).
silky trash
A piece of plastic pollution, perhaps a milk crate, floats by.
sunset rays
Sunset or sunrise?
throwing bows
A partial rainbow at sea.
thrusted
The engines of the R/V Roger Revelle can churn the ocean in some delightful ways.
Velella Bucket
A fellow sailor. This is a velella, a small jellyfish that travels the surface of the ocean using its transparent sail to catch the wind.
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Captain David Murline holds a velella up to the horizon before releasing it back to the sea.

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GEOTRACES GP15 is supported by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.